1) Drug Relapse Prevention | Early Warning Signs & Coping Skills
2) Alcohol and Drug Addiction Relapse Prevention Guide
3) Relapse Prevention | Recovery.org

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drug relapse prevention worksheets

Unfortunately, because no one is ever “cured” completely from the temptations of addiction, relapse is too often a part of the recovery process.

A drug or alcohol relapse does not mean the end of recovery, it’s merely a stage in the journey that needs to be effectively dealt with.

Although relapse can be emotionally difficult on both the recovering addict and the family, relapse should never mean an acceptance of failure.

A relapse prevention plan is simply a plan for how you can prevent a relapse or a return to drug use after a period of abstinence. A relapse prevention plan can be a simple plan that is a couple of pages long or a detailed plan for making changes to all the areas of your life that have been damaged by drug use.

Keep in mind that the more work you put into your recovery, the more it will improve your life. A basic plan should include your triggers and how to manage cravings. A more detailed plan can include everything you want to work on in your life.

Try not to become overwhelmed by your plan. There is no time limit for working on your relapse prevention plan. It can be something that you continue to work on and add thing to over months or years. It can be a guide to help keep you on the right track and focus your energy on recovery.

Our relapse prevention education is derived from state of the art evidence-based practices . We help individuals learn skills to identify, anticipate, and react to high risk situations, as well as coping skills for cravings and urges. A focus in our relapse prevention counseling is helping an individual develop an understanding of drugs and addictive behaviors that leads to an enhanced sense of self-efficacy with respect to adhering to their personalized relapse prevention plan.

At Gateway we integrate mindfulness practices with evidence-based counseling and therapy (treatment that is backed by research).

For more information about Gateway treatment programs , or our free, confidential consultation , call our 24-hour helpline at 877-505-4673.

Sometimes people quit their drug use for a while, but start using again no matter how hard they try not to. This return to drug use is called a relapse. People recovering from addiction often have one or more relapses along the way. For some drugs, a relapse can be very dangerous—even deadly. If a person uses as much as they used to before quitting, they can easily overdose. An overdose occurs when the person uses too much of a drug and has a toxic reaction that results in serious, harmful symptoms or death. Someone can overdose on purpose or accidentally.

Drug addiction is a chronic (long-lasting) disease. That means it stays with the person for a long time, sometimes for life. It doesn't go away like a cold. A person with an addiction can get treatment and stop using drugs. But if they started using again, they would:

Recovery from addiction means you have to stop using drugs AND learn new ways of thinking, feeling, and dealing with problems. Drug addiction makes it hard to function in daily life. It affects how you act with your family, at work, and in the community. It is hard to change so many things at once and not fall back into old habits.

Most times, people momentarily quit the use of drugs, alcohol, and even tobacco, but begin using them again no matter how hard they try to stop using them.  This return to alcohol, drugs, and tobacco is termed a relapse. So, individuals who are recovering from the addiction of any kind usually have one or more relapses in the process. But is this what relapse is all about? Not really.

Relapse is the progressive process of becoming so abnormal or dysfunctional in recovery that engaging is self-medication with drugs and alcohol seems to be the best alternative.

Going back to alcohol or drugs again is the worst option for people who are in recovery. This extent of damage caused by such return is usually higher compared to the earlier stage. Most individuals in this regard will be able to garner the strength to stop their addiction while others will rapidly fall back.

If you have successfully completed an intensive drug treatment program, you feel a tremendous amount of pride and achievement. During your treatment stay, you had worked for a long period of time in a tightly structured environment to address the underlying roots of your addiction, and through your perseverance and determination you addressed and overcame your substance abuse. Now that you are at home and  are ready to resume your normal family and work life, you are armed with tools, support and confidence you need to begin your life in recovery. You feel as though a chapter in a book in closing and that the worst is behind you; but is your work in recovery done?

The reality is that the real work in your recovery is just beginning, and once you come home your number one goal is to maintain your hard-earned sobriety. Addiction is a cunning and powerful disease , and the triggers and temptations of your home environment are ever present. Your top priority in your recovery journey from this point forward is drug relapse prevention. While relapse in recovery is considered a common phenomenon, you certainly don't want to be part of that statistic. In order to keep on the path of sobriety, it is highly recommended that you attend some form of aftercare programming which features drug  relapse prevention education .

While relapse prevention programming is not a requirement, it can be an immeasurably beneficial component of a comprehensive long-term recovery plan. Aftercare programs that feature relapse prevention at its foundation will give you the extra support and motivation you need to stay clean and sober. By providing continuing counseling, group sessions and other schedule meetings, relapse prevention programs provide an extra level of accountability that helps insure that the individual has not fallen back on old habits and behaviors.

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Our relapse prevention education is derived from state of the art evidence-based practices . We help individuals learn skills to identify, anticipate, and react to high risk situations, as well as coping skills for cravings and urges. A focus in our relapse prevention counseling is helping an individual develop an understanding of drugs and addictive behaviors that leads to an enhanced sense of self-efficacy with respect to adhering to their personalized relapse prevention plan.

At Gateway we integrate mindfulness practices with evidence-based counseling and therapy (treatment that is backed by research).

For more information about Gateway treatment programs , or our free, confidential consultation , call our 24-hour helpline at 877-505-4673.